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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Policy-Makers Use of Social Science Knowledge :Symbolic or Instrumental? found in the catalog.

Policy-Makers Use of Social Science Knowledge :Symbolic or Instrumental?

Karin D. Knorr

Policy-Makers Use of Social Science Knowledge :Symbolic or Instrumental?

by Karin D. Knorr

  • 252 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination29 p.
Number of Pages29
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14288492M

  This is an important, interesting, and timely book. What is more—and unlike so many edited collections—it actually does what it says on the tin, exploring the interplay between social science research, public debates, and policy making in the area of international migration and immigration from a number of different perspectives.   Written in clear, concise prose, Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research offers essential guidance for those who evaluate educational policies. Using numerous examples of high-quality studies that have evaluated the causal impacts of important educational interventions, the authors go beyond the Reviews:

  Knowledge translation strategies are an approach to increase the use of evidence within policy and practice decision-making contexts. In clinical and health service contexts, knowledge translation strategies have focused on individual behavior change, however the multi-system context of public health requires a multi-level, multi-strategy approach. Social Science Knowledge in Family Law Cases: Judicial Gate-keeping in TheDaubertEra Frequently, social science-based instrumental and empirical claims, rather than moral ones, are used to justify family attorneys, and policy-makers use social science to develop their decisions, strategies, and recommendations, they need to.

  Innvaer S, Vist G, Trommald M, Oxman A. Health Policy-makers' Perceptions of Their Use of Evidence: A Systematic Review. J Health Serv Res Policy. ; 7 (4)– doi: / Landry R, Amara N, Lamari M. Climbing the Ladder of Research Utilization: Evidence from Social Science Research. Science Communication. - Policy science studies the process of deciding or choosing and evaluating the relevance of available knowledge for the solution of particular problems - Policy science should be an independent academic discipline, instead it is often within PA/Econ/PS - Propaganda technique in WWI ()- landmark analysis of state use of propaganda.


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Policy-Makers Use of Social Science Knowledge :Symbolic or Instrumental? by Karin D. Knorr Download PDF EPUB FB2

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KNORR-CETINA, Karin D., Policymakers' Use of Social Science Knowledge: symbolic or Instrumental?.In: WEISS, Carol H., ed. Using Social Research in Public. Policymaker’s use of social sciences knowledge: Symbolic or instrumental. In Using social research in public policy making, edited by C.

Weiss, Lexington, MA: Lexington Books. Google ScholarCited by: policy-makers use of social science knowledge: symbolic or instrumental. By Karin D. Knorr. were directly involved with contract research. since there are no lists of the universe of government officials funding social science projects the study cannot claim to be representative for the population; however, extensive search processes on the Author: Karin D.

Knorr. Policymakers’ use of social science knowledge—Symbolic or instrumental. In C. Weiss (Ed.), Using social research in public policy making (pp. Policy makers are likely to be keen to signal the importance of research precisely where its value is symbolic. They will be more reticent about using knowledge where it has had an impact on the substance of policy.

This in turn raises questions about REF provisions on demonstrating impact. policy-makers interested in social research. Exploring the the nature and patterns of knowledge-use and policyskills insidegovernment agencies have been largely hidden between instrumental, conceptual and symbolic use.

‘Instrumental’ use of research refers to direct and. Social Policy Report V26 #2 2 The Uses of Research in Policy and Practice From the Editors Since Francis Bacon established the scientiic method, there have surely been individuals trying to igure out how the knowledge generated by science could be applied and indeed be.

While there is an extensive literature on research-policy relations across fields of social science (notably in sociology, science and technology studies, social policy, political science and. This book draws on the scientific policy studies approach to develop a basic understanding of the policymaking process, which is here viewed as an inherently political process involving conflict and struggle among people (public officials and private citizens) with.

Knorr, K D,“Policy makers' use of social science knowledge: Symbolic or instrumental?”, in Using Social Research in Public Policy Making Ed.

Weiss, C H (Lexington Books, Lexington, MA) pp – utilization in policy formulation is limited, the literature abounds with social scientists speculation about why the information they produce has little impact on policy matters. Either explicitly or implicitly, the most prevalent theory found in this literature may be characterized as the &dquo;Two-Communities&dquo; theory.

Authors who hold this view attempt to explain nonutilization in. Studies of knowledge utilization in public policy-making have important practical and theoretical implications. Accordingly, a voluminous work has been done on understanding and explaining the process of knowledge utilization (see Rich and Oh, ).

However, we can easily find that there is the conspicuous absence of a greatly expanded understanding of the use of knowledge from those. K.D. KnorrPolicy-makers use of social science knowledge: symbolic or instrumental.

C.H. Weiss (Ed.), Using Social Research in Public Policy Making, Lexington Books, Toronto (), pp. Google Scholar. ‘Accounts and Action: The Logic(s) of Social Science and Pragmatic Knowledge.’ In Realizing Social Science Knowledge.

The Political Realization of Social Science Knowledge and Research: Toward New Scenarios, edited by Holzner, B., Knorr, K. and Strasser, H. Vienna: Physica Verlag, pp.

73–8. ‘Instrumental’ use of research refers to direct and measurable influence, such as when expert recommendations are adopted to some extent in the policy-making process; this is contrasted with ‘conceptual’ influence, whereby ways of thinking about an issue are changed over a long period of time; and ‘symbolic’ or political influence.

Instrumental use denotes rather direct application of knowledge for policy interventions and alternatives, whereas conceptual use is less direct, more long term, and rather directed at general.

Policymakers’ use of social science knowledge—Symbolic or instrumental. In C. Weiss (Ed.), Using social research in public policy making (pp. in the Institute for Social Science Research at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, many accounts, policy makers do not use aca-demic research to its fullest potential (Nutley, Walter, and Davies ).

role is instrumental or symbolic is a parallel. The ‘symbolic’ version is where evidence is harnessed by policy makers to justify pre-existing policy stances rather than acting as a guide for action. This account, although useful, remains abstract.

Weiss has demonstrated that although social science expertise can make useful contributions to policy analysis and debate over an extended period of time, the findings of a specific report or article seldom align with the immediate needs of policy makers, and so the impacts of research are indirect (Weiss, ).

I am not very familiar with it but I know that it identifies different types of research use and that instrumental use (that direct kind the REF seems to value) is only about 12% of all research use.

The most common kind is conceptual, wherein research helps policy makers (or other users of research) think differently about the issues.In her seminal work on how policymakers use social science, Carol Weiss observed a great variety of symbolical uses, which the policymakers themselves described as: “supporting,” “backing up,” “selling,” “justifying,” and “documenting” (Weiss ,–).

Importantly, symbolic uses do not prevent conceptual and.